UK Occupation Table
Updated over a week ago

The occupation table can be found in the occupations tab on Analyst. Here is where you can see more detailed information about jobs, earnings and openings.There are two ways you can amend the headings on any table on Analyst. As you enter the selection page, click 'Custom Data Selection' or once you have run the report select 'Add/Remove Columns'.

In this tutorial we are going to go through all the options on the occupation table from left to right.

Table basics

  • Description- Official Classification title of the SOC code

  • 2015 Jobs (Current Year)- Number of newly created jobs in the current year

  • 2010 Jobs (Start Year)- Number of newly created jobs in your start year of your timeframe

  • 2020 Jobs (End Year)- Number of newly created jobs in the end year of your timeframe

  • Any further consecutive years (All Years)- Number of newly created jobs split across the years in your timeframe. (E.g If your timeframe was 2013-2016, then the years 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016, would appear)

Change

  • Jobs Change- the difference between the start year and end year of your timeframe.

  • % Jobs Change- the percentage change of the difference between the start year and end year of your timeframe.

  • Current Year- How concentrated an occupation is in your region compared to the nation for the current year

  • Start Year- How concentrated an occupation is in your region compared to the nation for your start year of your timeframe

  • End Year- How concentrated an occupation is in your region compared to the nation for the end year of your timeframe

  • All years- How concentrated an occupation is in your region compared to the nation for each year in your timeframe. (E.g If your timeframe was 2013-2016, then the years 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016, would appear)

Openings

  • Openings- The number of newly created jobs (as seen above) in addition to job churn over you timeframe. This includes retirement, death and changing employment.

  • Annual Openings- The number above divided by the number of years in your timeframe.

Earnings

  • Pct. 10 Hourly Earnings- Average hourly earnings of the bottom 10% of this occupation

  • Pct. 25 Hourly Earnings- Average hourly earnings of the bottom 25% of this occupation

  • Median Hourly Earnings- Average hourly earnings of 50% of this occupation

  • Pct. 75 Hourly Earnings- Average hourly earnings of the top 25% of this occupation

  • Pct. 90 Hourly Earnings- Average hourly earnings of the top 10% of this occupation

  • Occ. Mix Effect- If we look only at nationwide trends this number is what we predict the (date range’s) change to be

  • Nat'l Growth Effect- If we looked solely at the growth of the economy as a whole this number is what we predict the (date range’s) change to be.

  • Expected Change- Combines the (Ind./occ.) mix effect & nation growth to show what this region should look like if it was completely statistically average. Change above this level is credited to the region’s competitive effect.

  • Competitive Effect- The difference between the actual change and the expected change. Provides a numerical value for how unique the areas is.

Education Level

  • Education Level- The average educational level of this occupation

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